Lesson 4

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  • #18644

    Tried shooting this glass of wine corks at night time inside on manual. After switching 3 different lens I decided to go with the 5omm. Was a challenge, however I learned alot about my camera and the importances of having self patience when surfing on a learning curve. 馃槇
    Shot #1 no filters just natural lens
    [attachment=1:32pux4m5]DSC_0897.jpg[/attachment:32pux4m5]
    Shot #2 WITH the gray grad filter lens
    [attachment=0:32pux4m5]DSC_0866.jpg[/attachment:32pux4m5]
    Seems its a bit more contrasty then the top pictures and darker. Almost like its sunglasses for the camera. 馃槑
    Id like to order a few color lens and try the black and white photography.
    Any site you recommend ordering these lenses?
    I also bought a polarized lens from some miami dealer and embarrassingly over paid. (I got taken) any brand you recommend in particular?
    Thanks for your critiques!

    #21063
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    First things first here.

    Here is the exif data for these images:

    [attachment=0:3r9ya8l5]DSC_0897 EXIF.png[/attachment:3r9ya8l5]
    Date Time Original: 2013:02:01 08:40:22
    Exposure Time: 1/2
    F Number: f / 2.50
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: Spot
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 50mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 500/10 500/10 18/10 18/10
    LensModel: 50.0 mm f/1.8
    Lens: 50.0 mm f/1.8
    Exif Version:
    Date Time Digitized: 2013:02:01 08:40:22
    Subsec Time Original: 60
    Subsec Time Digitized: 60
    Shutter Speed Value: 1.32
    Aperture Value: 2.64
    Exposure Bias: 3
    Max Aperture Value: 1.60
    Light Source: Unknown
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    CFA Pattern: 752
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 75mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: None
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Normal
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    ExifIFDPointer: 218
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2013:02:01 19:46:10
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4.1 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2013-02-01T08:40:22.60

    [attachment=1:3r9ya8l5]DSC_0866 EXIF.png[/attachment:3r9ya8l5]
    Date Time Original: 2013:02:01 08:29:02
    Exposure Time: 1/2
    F Number: f / 2.50
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: Spot
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 50mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 500/10 500/10 18/10 18/10
    LensModel: 50.0 mm f/1.8
    Lens: 50.0 mm f/1.8
    Exif Version:
    Date Time Digitized: 2013:02:01 08:29:02
    Subsec Time Original: 50
    Subsec Time Digitized: 50
    Shutter Speed Value: 1.32
    Aperture Value: 2.64
    Exposure Bias: 3
    Max Aperture Value: 1.60
    Light Source: Unknown
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    CFA Pattern: 752
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 75mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: None
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Normal
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    ExifIFDPointer: 218
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2013:02:01 19:45:35
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4.1 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2013-02-01T08:29:02.50

    Your 50 mm 1.8 is a very very nice lens. It will produce some very sharp images. Just be aware of all of your lenses minimum focus distance.

    Also when shooting something handheld you will be hard pressed to get a sharp image at a shutter speed as slow as 1/2 of a second. You will most like get camera shake.

    The most important thing you can take away here is that filters are important. Knowing when and how to use them is pretty key.

    For example a gray graduated filter would be a great filter to use on a bright sunset or something where you need to even out the exposure of an image. Of course you have to compensate your settings when using a filter like this. This filter knocks down the light so you can’t shoot the same settings (like you did here). Try using this filter on a sunset or something where the sky is bright and the ground is not too bright.

    Don’t be afraid of using a tripod either even for static shots like this. Gitzo makes the best tripods.

    As much as it pains me to say this I use amazon for my photography gear.

    Don’t worry too much about the brand of filters though. Just try to figure out how they work and what they do. Try shooting something with a heavy reflection with your polarized filter. Watch it eliminate the reflection 馃槢

    See you on the next assignment.

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