Kirk

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • in reply to: Wyckoff – Lesson 11 #20353
    Kirk
    Participant

    Thanks! All I did is mess with the color levels in the background. I played around with some of the filters and such if you would like to see more but I just like being as pure as possible for now. I used GIMP which is pretty powerful considering its free. Also, do you have other classes we could take?

    in reply to: Lesson 9 – Wyckoff #20339
    Kirk
    Participant

    I found some old farm equipment being consumed by the woods while I was out shooting one day. Here are some of those shots. Plus, I put a couple others I did. Hopefully this is a mix of tonal values and harsh dark/lights. Let me know how I could have framed the farm equipment shots better. There was so much going on since the woods was pretty thick. I tried to isolate it as best I could.

    Thanks,
    Kirk

    in reply to: Lesson 9 – Wyckoff #20337
    Kirk
    Participant

    I certainly can! I took a bunch that day. I will post something this week.

    in reply to: Lesson 8 – Wyckoff #20335
    Kirk
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback! Yes, the filters I used were a set of them that you can magnify 1x, 2x and 4x. I used the 4x close up filter(they fit just like a normal one, like UV). I knew the depth of field would be really shallow though not as drastic as this ended up. The goal was to make the sprout look like it was emerging out of a “cloud”. I do plan to get more into macro stuff because I love close ups. You can make things look very surreal and abstract which is what I like. The problem is the cost. Soon, very soon. 🙂

    Thanks again. This is an awesome class.

    Kirk

    in reply to: Advanced Composition #20258
    Kirk
    Participant

    Amazing shot!

    in reply to: Lesson 8 #20330
    Kirk
    Participant

    I really like the blues in this shot. I think the color adds to the emotion.

    in reply to: Lesson 6 – Wyckoff #20293
    Kirk
    Participant

    I like graveyards. Especially old ones. I was visting one and took this real fast shot. Obviously there were a ton of graves so I blurred those I wasn’t interested in out. Is this more in line with the assignment? I know the shot is nothing special, I just took it to make sure I got what you were looking for in assignment 6.

    Kirk

    in reply to: Lesson 5 – Wyckoff #20216
    Kirk
    Participant

    Oops, wanted to put this on in as well. Sorry about that.

    in reply to: color theory #20241
    Kirk
    Participant

    Did that shot of a dandelion use a polorizing filter to get the sky so blue? Just curious.

    in reply to: Lesson 2 – Kirk #20204
    Kirk
    Participant

    Oops, thought we could upload a doc…. Here is my submission:

    When I was in high school I loved to draw and I was certain that I would end up going into the arts. However, due to some life events, I fell away from that passion and ended up going into computers. To this day however, I still love art and more specifically, artists that can capture extraordinary detail in their work. Maybe that’s what has drawn me to photography… detail.

    While deciding on an artist for this assignment I had to choose a painter, not a photographer. This is because it was a specific painter that captured my attention as a teenager and amazed me with the talent he must have to create his works. Chuck Close is simply exceptional and no one can capture detail better.
    It seems to me that any photographer would naturally be drawn to Chuck Close. His portraits reveal camera-like detail but he uses oil paint, not lenses, f-stops or shutter speeds. The emotion, flaws, atmosphere and beauty that are so important to a good portrait photograph are present in a Close painting. In fact, the school of art that Close represented was called Photorealism.

    So what painting grabbed my attention and led me to an obsession with detail and realism; Close’s “Big Self-Portrait”. This painting is incredible, he reveals every detail and managed to do this by using a fairly monochromatic color pallet. I was actually introduced to the painter in a high school art history class. Typically, I had a hard time staying awake because the teacher was so boring. However, when the slide came up with this particular image, my attention was focused and I was hooked.

    Close takes photographs, in the 60’s he typically used Polaroids, and grids them using a technique that has been used since the Renaissance. He then takes the image and transfers it to canvas block by block using paint. I still get amazed by how he can manipulate such a limited color selection. It’s almost in complete gray-scale and he achieves the same tonal ranges we struggle to get in a good black and white photograph. Even Ansel Adams would be envious.

    Aside from from his manipulation of color, or lack there of, you cannot help but be amazed by the detail he reveals. In “Big Self-Portrait” you can see reflections on his glasses, skin flaws, individual strands of hair and even smoke from the cigarette that dangles precariously from his mouth.

    Finally, aside from the detail and ability to manipulate color, what amazes me is Close’s patience. His paintings can take months or even years to complete. As photographers, we are often blessed with a great photo in less than a second. However, I feel I can learn from Close. If I demonstrate patience with my photography, I can get the “exact” shot I want to create. You don’t get great photos by being impatient, you get lucky. Great photos take time to think out and compose, just like great paintings.

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Wyckoff #20200
    Kirk
    Participant

    Thanks for the comments! No the crosshairs were not intentional. I did consider my background and how it would compliment the flowers (if you notice the green blur with the pink flowers). I just have to keep practicing. I want to get “control” of the camera more. That flower shot was outside actually. The fountain was an indoor shot at my company’s lobby. Thanks for the link to your work! AWESOME stuff!

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Wyckoff #20197
    Kirk
    Participant

    How about something more like this… I tried to capture a fountain and blur it so that it looked more like an actual solid object.

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Wyckoff #20195
    Kirk
    Participant

    I see what you mean. I was hoping the water in the background would show the motion. I have other shots for you that should fit the bill. I will post another one. Thanks!

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Wyckoff #20193
    Kirk
    Participant

    I have a Canon Rebel Xs. My lens is the standard, crappy 70-300 zoom that does not have any image stabilization. The first flower shot was done with aperature priority and the bottom was shutter priority. I have another shot that I did all manual that got some decent “blurred” backgrounds if you would like to see that one as well. I run each of my shots with a very light “unsharp mask” to grab some detail. Did I do something wrong? Until I get better, I use manual focus and a priority mode. The only time I use all manual is when I have a tripod and I can control all the elements of the picture. I still have plenty to learn :-).

    Kirk

    in reply to: Lesson 1 #20178
    Kirk
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback. One question I have and I always struggle with this… composition. I hate centered photos unless they fill out the whole frame. Basically, if they are truly the whole subject and nothing else matters. In my photo, do you feel that having nothing on the right side hurt the picture? My goal, and this is going to sound weird, was to balance the image with the green color contrasting the dark brown. Does that make sense? Did it work? I agree I should have focused on the eyes by the way! I was trying to show the texture of the statue and I thought the ears had better grooves. 🙂 Thanks for the feedback!

    Kirk

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)