Duncan Rawlinson

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  • in reply to: Portfolio #30276
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Darcee,

    The very first thing I noticed was the lack of info on your about page:
    http://dhite.photoshelter.com/#!/about

    Also the “contact info goes here” on every page.

    I would remove the bird photos from the animals page.

    Also I would remove the engagement rings photo from the people page.

    Sometimes less is more.

    Also add some names to your images. This helps people viewing and SEO.

    Think of your site as a garden. If you don’t work on it it will just die off.

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: Lesson 6 assignment #30170
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jess,

    Thanks for submitting your assignment.

    Here is the EXIF data for these images:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Taylo.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:06:17 03:42:57
    Exposure Time: 1/125
    F Number: f / 8
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 1600
    Metering Mode: CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 28mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 180/10 550/10 35/10 56/10
    LensModel: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
    Lens: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/taylo2.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:06:17 03:43:03
    Exposure Time: 1/125
    F Number: f / 8
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 1600
    Metering Mode: CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 46mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 180/10 550/10 35/10 56/10
    LensModel: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
    Lens: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/DSC_2874.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:06:17 03:41:00
    Exposure Time: 1/125
    F Number: f / 8
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 1600
    Metering Mode: CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 28mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 180/10 550/10 35/10 56/10
    LensModel: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
    Lens: 18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6

    If there is one thing I immediately noticed here it’s that your use use of leading lines in these images is really great!

    Placing your model right where you did was a really really nice choice. In terms of the assignment itself you’ve done really really well. What’s more your model’s pose and expression are all good. Your background is elegant and relatively simple.

    Well done!

    Specifically with respect to:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/taylo2.jpg

    In a situation like this where it’s quite dark you may want to use an off camera flash to fill in some of the darker areas. This will also make your model pop out a little more from the background.

    Another suggestion here would be to use shallower depth of field. In this way your background is even more smooth and buttery.

    You want your viewer to look at your model not your background. So they viewer only needs as much information as you want to give them. In this case just enough to know she’s out in some kind of market.

    Also I want you to remember to be close. This is so easy to forget but it’s also really important.

    So with this image a little closer, shallower depth of field, and a little fill from either some kind of bounce or flash.

    With respect to:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/DSC_2874.jpg

    This is the type of scenario that is really calling for an HDR photo.

    A ‘high dynamic range’ image is one that basically has more brights and more darks all in the same image.

    Do you notice here how it’s extremely bright outside the market where the tree is but very dark inside?

    There is no way to properly expose this image and see both properly in one photo.

    So what you do is you ‘bracket’ a few exposures. Meaning you should some underexposed and some overexposed images and then merge them together later on your computer.

    HDR is a whole other topic outside this lesson but you may want to learn how to do it properly. There a tons of free tutorials and lessons on this subject.

    It’s very useful for scenarios like this where you have white hot highlights (outside) and super black darks (inside in this photo).

    One final note here would be to pay attention to strong horizontal lines.

    Notice the brown lines on the ceiling. They make the images feel crooked.

    This really becomes a problem when you make prints of these images because the edge of the print/frame will make this feel even more crooked.

    So in future just be aware that if there are super strong horizontal lines you’ll want them to be level and match the horizon. Either that or make them intentionally off kilter (dutch angle)

    I hope this helps.

    Keep up the good work.

    See you on the next assignment.

    in reply to: Lesson 6: Assignment #29080
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jessica,

    Thanks for submitting another assignment.

    Here is the EXIF data for these images:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/221.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:03:20 18:00:47
    Exposure Time: 1/1250
    F Number: f / 4
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 800
    Metering Mode: Partial
    Flash: Flash fired, compulsory flash mode, red-eye reduction mode
    Focal Length: 12.60mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
    Model: KODAK EasyShare Z5010 Digital Camera
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 3216
    Pixel Y Dimension: 4288
    Maker Note: 14916
    Date Time Digitized: 2015:03:20 18:00:47
    Subsec Time Original: 000
    Subsec Time Digitized: 000
    Shutter Speed Value: 10.20
    Aperture Value: 4
    Brightness Value: 4
    Max Aperture Value: 4
    Light Source: Unknown
    Exposure Index: 800
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 70mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: High gain up
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Soft
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 18728
    ExifIFDPointer: 14246
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 480
    Y Resolution: 480
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2015:03:20 18:00:47

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/202.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:03:20 17:51:58
    Exposure Time: 1/1250
    F Number: f / 4.90
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 1600
    Metering Mode: Partial
    Flash: Flash fired, compulsory flash mode, red-eye reduction mode
    Focal Length: 27mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
    Model: KODAK EasyShare Z5010 Digital Camera
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 3216
    Pixel Y Dimension: 4288
    Maker Note: 14916
    Date Time Digitized: 2015:03:20 17:51:58
    Subsec Time Original: 000
    Subsec Time Digitized: 000
    Shutter Speed Value: 10.20
    Aperture Value: 4.50
    Brightness Value: 4
    Max Aperture Value: 4.60
    Light Source: Unknown
    Exposure Index: 1600
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 150mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: High gain up
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Soft
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 18728
    ExifIFDPointer: 14246
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 480
    Y Resolution: 480
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2015:03:20 17:51:58

    With the camera system you’re using here, shooting in low light may not ideal. You can see your camera introduced a bunch of noise into the images. Remember you can use a tripod for environmental portraits like this.

    I would advise that with this camera you need a little more natural light for something like this.

    Remember to set your white balance as well. Notice how different the colors can be when using automatic white balance. For this type of shoot it’s particularly important because you’ll want the look to match if you’re presenting a series of images together.

    In terms of the simplification aspect of the assignment you’ve done well here. I’m not sure I like the pose where we cannot see the gentleman’s face but this is entirely subjective.

    Some things to take away here are as follows.

    If you’re camera is not good in low light, avoid shooting in low light if possible. Alternatively try to ensure cleaner images at lower ISOs. Even using a tripod if needed.

    Also always set your white balance. This is essential if you are not shooting in raw because the colors of your series of images will not match up.

    Overall I think you need to keep working and keep practicing.

    Good job and see you on the next assignment.

    in reply to: Lesson 5: Color, New Subject #28540
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    hi jessica,

    Thanks for reshooting that assignment.

    Your new image is very much improved. In fact this is your best image yet!

    Here is the EXIF data for this image:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/079.jpg

    Date Time Original: 2015:05:02 14:21:48
    Exposure Time: 1/320
    F Number: f / 18
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 800
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 40mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: SONY
    Model: ILCE-3000
    LensInfo: 4
    LensModel: E 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 5456
    Pixel Y Dimension: 3632
    CompressedBitsPerPixel: 4
    Maker Note: 4972
    User Comment: 40672
    Date Time Digitized: 2015:05:02 14:21:48
    Brightness Value: 9.35
    Max Aperture Value: 4.34
    Light Source: Unknown
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 60mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Normal
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 40736
    ExifIFDPointer: 2330
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 350
    Y Resolution: 350
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2015:05:02 14:21:48
    Image Description:
    Software: ILCE-3000 v1.01

    Now in terms of this assignment you’ve done much better here.

    The color is quite simple and I think it works but there are some areas where you could improve here.

    In a classic landscape photo like this it’s almost always best to shoot using a tripod and at as low an ISO as you can possibly go.

    In this case you shot at ISO 800 which can sometimes impact the color and wash things out a little.

    Shooting at a slower shutter speed and lower ISO on a tripod may have helped here.

    The main goal of this assignment is to get you to think about color. In this case it looks like you’ve done that and you’ve chosen green as your primary organizing element.

    Remember to always be cognizant of your composition as well.

    In this case the most interesting stuff, the trees/are crammed up in the tip right quadrant of the frame.

    Other than that there are some lines which are drawing my eye toward the tree in the top right of the frame so that’s good.

    In future use lines like this to draw your viewers eye to the most interesting thing in the frame. For example a persons face.

    One more note here would be to ask yourself in almost all scenarios like this is: whats the most interesting thing here? Then just shoot that!

    That is of course unless you’re creating the thing… IE with a model or in a studio or something.

    Try to think of this assignments as not just assignments but also portfolio pieces. In other words would you put this on your wall and frame it?

    If so, that’s great. If not keep working at it until you’re happy with the result.

    Lastly the time of day here is also very harsh flat light. To get better and more interesting colors try shooting during magic hour.

    I hope all of this helps and see you on the next assignment.

    in reply to: Lesson 5: Color Reshoot #28407
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    I see. This is a good try but yes please find another subject and reshoot this one. I’m just pushing you a little harder here because you can do better!

    Please re-shoot this assignment.

    You may have better luck with your colors if you shoot at magic hour.

    Keep it up!

    in reply to: Lesson 5: Color Reshoot #28382
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jessica,

    Can you let me know what you we’re trying to achieve here?

    in reply to: Lesson 5: Color #28340
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jessica,

    Can you reshoot this assignment? Your photo is not in focus.

    Thank you!

    in reply to: Lesson 5 assignment #28178
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Photoshop elements is a great start but I highly recommend Lightroom if you want to get serious about this stuff!

    Keep it up!

    in reply to: Lesson 2 #28022
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for submitting your assignment.

    Jay Maisel is a really interesting guy and a great photographer so you’ve made a really excellent choice here. Jay Maisel is a generalist in photography and you can learn a great deal from his works.

    Check out this video about him:

    Here are a couple more videos:

    Jay is absolutely right about the notion of light gesture and color. However being able to get to the point where you can photograph all three well takes a great deal of practice and time.

    And this is the exact idea behind this lesson, to set you on the path of being inspired to continue going with your photography as long as possible.

    Jay’s raindrops photo is a typical example of the idea that there is literally always a way to make something appear more interesting that it actually is using photography. And sometimes it’s a bit counterintuitive. In this case the rain is more interesting than anything else going on here.

    In the clock photograph there are several frames within a frame. This is a very handy tool to keep in your belt and a great way to augment your photographs. Always be on the lookout for frames you can use inside the frame of your image. What’s more, they don’t have to be rectangular or the same shape as your camera’s aspect ratio as is the case here.

    In the sky image you can see an example of minimalism and elegant simplicity. Again this is another tool to keep on your photo toolset if you will. If the interesting element is the sky shoot the sky and add a little plane and remove everything else. As you said, you don’t even need to see the sun or anything else to know what is going on.

    Natural light also happens to be my preferred method of shooting as well.

    In fact as you have seen in the videos I’ve listed here this is how Jay Maisel prefers to see the world as well. He likes to keep things honest and showcase them as they are. To be fair though there is a time and a place for strobes/speedlites/artificial light but it’s not my thing either.

    An interesting side note about Jay Maisel is that he once bought a building for very little money decades ago and recently sold it for 10s of millions recently. Amazing! Here is a video of the amazing building.

    Also I would recommend you purchase some of his books and study his works.

    Overall you’ve done a fine job here and I hope you continue to explore the other masters of photography and keep inspired.

    See you on the next assignment!

    in reply to: Lesson 2 #28020
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Also I had to remove the images you posted because Mr Maisel really does not like when people share his photographs. He has been known to take legal action against people… But don’t worry, I know which photos you’re referring to and we can learn from his works.

    Thank you.

    in reply to: Lesson 2 #28019
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi there,

    Your critique will be posted tomorrow. (April 9 2015)

    Thanks for your patience.

    in reply to: lesson 1 #27701
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Emily,

    Thanks for submitting your assignment to IPS.

    Here is a quick look at the EXIF data on your photographs.

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/IMG_0012.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2015:03:19 17:40:17
    Exposure Time: 1/4
    F Number: f / 8
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 35.56mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 4000
    Pixel Y Dimension: 3000
    CompressedBitsPerPixel: 3
    Maker Note: 734
    User Comment: 3036
    Date Time Digitized: 2015:03:19 17:40:17
    Shutter Speed Value: 2
    Aperture Value: 6
    Max Aperture Value: 4.66
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 16393.44
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 16393.44
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 2
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 3300
    ExifIFDPointer: 240
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 180
    Y Resolution: 180
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2015:03:19 17:40:17
    Image Description:

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/IMG_0017.jpg

    Date Time Original: 2015:03:19 17:47:29
    Exposure Time: 1/4
    F Number: f / 8
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 7.95mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon PowerShot SX20 IS
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 4000
    Pixel Y Dimension: 3000
    CompressedBitsPerPixel: 3
    Maker Note: 734
    User Comment: 3036
    Date Time Digitized: 2015:03:19 17:47:29
    Shutter Speed Value: 2
    Aperture Value: 6
    Max Aperture Value: 3.34
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 16393.44
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 16393.44
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 2
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 3300
    ExifIFDPointer: 240
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 180
    Y Resolution: 180
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2015:03:19 17:47:29
    Image Description:

    Before I really get into the details of this I want to thank you for getting going on your photography journey at the Icon Photography School.

    The course is self directed so there is no pressure but it’s up to you to keep up with your lessons. Nobody is going to ensure you’re working on your lessons. It’s up to you to follow through.

    Now let’s get into these photographs. For one thing an Orchid does not exactly meet the criteria for a mundane object but that’s ok! You’ve probably seen it so many times you’ve gotten used to it.

    The first and most important thing you’ve done here is to get closer to your subject:

    This is absolutely essential for good photographs and is the simplest and most overlooked way to get better photographs.

    When you get close it almost always results in photographs that are better because it makes you fill the frame.

    Take a look at this article on this very subject.

    There are a few small problems with these images that can easily be fixed.

    In this scenario with the settings you’ve used it’s almost impossible to get sharp (in focus) images because the hole on the front of your camera was open for 1/4 of a second. That means that light was entering through your lens and hitting your camera’s sensor for 1/4 of a second and any motion was also captured during that time. This is an oversimplification but it just means your photos will be a bit blurry in this scenario.

    It’s not clear if you set your camera manually or just used an automatic mode but whatever the case you would have needed to do a few things to fix this.

    One thing would have been using a higher ISO.

    ISO is just a fancy way of saying how sensitive your camera is.

    The higher the number the more sensitive your camera is. Why does that matter? Well in this case it was a relatively dark environment and ISO 100 at 1/4 of a second is too slow.

    Maybe ISO 400 would have been better. This would mean that your camera’s sensor was basically 4 times stronger and would therefore would be able to keep the hole on the front of your camera open for a much shorter period of time. In that way your photo would be less blurry.

    Here is an article on that exact subject.

    An alternative to higher ISO is using a flash.

    And yet another alternative in this scenario would be using a tripod.

    Another thing you could do to improve here is to avoid cutting off parts of your main subject. In this case a part of the flower is cut off in the lower part of the

    Take a look at this article on that subject.

    The bottom line is, if you’re going to cutoff parts of your main subject do it intentionally and with purpose.

    I’m using overly simplistic terminology here but suffice it to say that you’re doing great and you will get better. Don’t worry if this feels confusing and the camera feels overwhelming.

    You’ll get the hang of it with some work. It’s like anything, you would not expect to be a master at playing piano without practice. Photography is the same way.

    Keep it up!

    in reply to: Lesson 3: Assignment #26792
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster
    in reply to: Lesson 3: Assignment #26780
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    I looked up your camera and it has good manual control. The problem here is that you’re shooting in the dark. There is not enough light. Your camera is not like your eyes. It needs light. Your eyes in combination with your brain will compensate for the lack of light. If there is low light your camera will struggle to create any kind of shallow depth of field.

    http://resources.kodak.com/support/shtml/en/manuals/urg01291/urg01291c2s12.shtml

    Also note that since your exposure was so long here the image is out of focus due to camera shake.

    Here is an example of something that would meet the criteria of this assignment but shot with your exact camera:
    http://www.cnet.com/pictures/kodak-easyshare-z5010-sample-pictures/11/

    In this example there was lots of light and the camera was zoomed in and there was relatively shallow depth of field. Feel free to re-shoot this if you want or ask any questions.

    Thanks.

    in reply to: Lesson 3: Assignment #26777
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jessica,

    Thanks for submitting another assignment.

    I think you have understand the motion portion of the assignment but I would like you to re-shoot the shallow depth of portion but first take a look at this:

    When you’ve done that re-submit this lesson as a new topic.

    Thank you

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 2,002 total)