Lesson 6 Assignment

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  • #24849
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Initially, I wasn’t sure if the following image would satisfy the requirement for this assignment due to the chain-link fence appearing busy, but I thought it was interesting to see a lion’s expression drinking goat milk, by squirting it in her mouth.

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    #24859
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    You’re right it is an interesting image. However it doesn’t really meet the requirements of the assignment.

    Can you shoot another image for this assignment?

    Keep in mind, you don’t have to do anything… If it doesn’t feel fun or you don’t want to do something here, don’t do it!!!

    Thanks!

    #24866
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Here are a couple other images that I had taken this past weekend at this historical event, that I believe should have submitted in the first place. Most of what I took that day, I wasn’t too happy with because my camera was on the incorrect setting (shutter was too slow).

    Thanks.

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    #24882
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Maxxine,

    Since you are one of the better students I’d like to push you a little harder here.

    Your images are not quite as simple and elegant as they could be for this assignment.

    I would like you to re-shoot this one.

    Here are a couple examples of a similar subject with a different approach:

    wide angle horse

    photo by pixel_addict

    Horse

    photo by vixl

    Notice how the frame is filled and there is almost nothing extraneous?

    Please try this one again.

    Thank you!

    #24893
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Thanks, Duncan, I really appreciate the challenge! Up until now, I’ve generally avoided moving subjects because they are so tricky to compose, but I’ll get it right this time!

    #25009
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Assignment 6 Redo.

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    #25035
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Maxine,

    These are both nice images although one meets the criteria for assignment 6 better than the other.

    First here is the EXIF data for the images:

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/IMG_6100.jpg

    Date Time Original: 2014:11:12 17:22:27
    Exposure Time: 1/6
    F Number: f / 9
    Exposure Program: Aperture priority
    ISO Speed Ratings: 400
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 100mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon EOS 6D
    LensInfo: 100/1 100/1 0/0 0/0
    LensModel: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM
    LensSerialNumber: 000004dbe4
    Lens: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM
    Exif Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Date Time Digitized: 2014:11:12 17:22:27
    Subsec Time Original: 00
    Subsec Time Digitized: 00
    Shutter Speed Value: 2.58
    Aperture Value: 6.34
    Max Aperture Value: 3
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 1520
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 1520
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 3
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Saturation: Normal
    ExifIFDPointer: 208
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2014:11:12 21:12:49
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5.6 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2014-11-12T17:22:27.00

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/IMG_6127.jpg

    Date Time Original: 2014:11:12 17:46:04
    Exposure Time: 1/40
    F Number: f / 7.10
    Exposure Program: Aperture priority
    ISO Speed Ratings: 800
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 100mm
    White Balance: Auto white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon EOS 6D
    LensInfo: 100/1 100/1 0/0 0/0
    LensModel: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM
    LensSerialNumber: 000004dbe4
    Lens: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM
    Exif Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Date Time Digitized: 2014:11:12 17:46:04
    Subsec Time Original: 00
    Subsec Time Digitized: 00
    Shutter Speed Value: 5.32
    Aperture Value: 5.66
    Max Aperture Value: 3
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 1520
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 1520
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 3
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Saturation: Normal
    ExifIFDPointer: 208
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2014:11:12 21:16:54
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5.6 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2014-11-12T17:46:04.00

    This image:
    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/IMG_6100.jpg

    Has a much simpler background and is a simpler image overall. Whereas the other image has a butterfly with more interesting wings the image has a more clutter background. Whatever the case you’ve under stood the assignment much better this time around. So job well done.

    Although, there is always room for improvement!

    In these two images you’ll notice that there are portions of the creature’s wings that are out of focus. It’s hard to tell whether this is motion blur or your depth of field is too shallow. Either way you generally want to avoid blurring out parts of the most interesting thing in the frame. In other words if you are trying to feature a particular thing using shallow depth of field, you should make all of said thing be in clear focus. This just takes practice and work on your part to bette understand the relationship between your lens and camera settings with respect to depth of field. Of course like all things photographic, this is another piece of advice thats entirely subjective. Like the rule of thirds this only applies if you want it to apply and you think that looks right. All I can say is that from my experience you’ll want to follow this notion.

    All in all these are two nice images. The image of the darker butterfly feels ever so slightly underexposed to me though.

    Remember to think about what metering mode you are using. Sometimes you have to compensate for your camera’s lack of a brain!

    Nice work here and see you on the next assignment.

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