Lesson 7 assignment

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  • #18647

    Hard Lighting#1 Shot at 2pm direct sunlight
    [attachment=1:3fh3e3ar]2013 02 06_3039_edited-1 copy-2.jpg[/attachment:3fh3e3ar]
    Soft Lighting
    [attachment=0:3fh3e3ar]2013 02 06_3105_edited-1 copy-2.jpg[/attachment:3fh3e3ar]
    Shot this when sun was getting lost in the clouds right as it was setting.

    #21075
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Ok so first things first. Here is the EXIF data for these images.

    [attachment=1:1ihzbhn4]2013 02 06_3039_edited-1 copy-2 EXIF.png[/attachment:1ihzbhn4]
    Date Time Original: 2013:02:06 05:57:35
    Exposure Time: 1/160
    F Number: f / 6.30
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 34mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 240/10 700/10 28/10 28/10
    LensModel: 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8
    Lens: 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8
    Exif Version:
    Date Time Digitized: 2013:02:06 05:57:35
    Shutter Speed Value: 7.32
    Aperture Value: 5.31
    Exposure Bias: 2
    Max Aperture Value: 3
    Light Source: Fine weather
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    CFA Pattern: 728
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 51mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: None
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Normal
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    ExifIFDPointer: 218
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2013:02:08 15:29:14
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4.1 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2013-02-06T05:57:35-05:00

    [attachment=0:1ihzbhn4]2013 02 06_3105_edited-1 copy-2 EXIF.png[/attachment:1ihzbhn4]

    Date Time Original: 2013:02:06 06:46:14
    Exposure Time: 1/125
    F Number: f / 4.50
    Exposure Program: Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings: 100
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Flash: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 35mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: NIKON CORPORATION
    Model: NIKON D7000
    LensInfo: 240/10 700/10 28/10 28/10
    LensModel: 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8
    Lens: 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8
    Exif Version:
    Date Time Digitized: 2013:02:06 06:46:14
    Shutter Speed Value: 6.97
    Aperture Value: 4.34
    Exposure Bias: 2
    Max Aperture Value: 3
    Light Source: Fine weather
    Sensing Method: One-chip color area sensor
    File Source: DSC
    Scene Type: Directly photographed
    CFA Pattern: 728
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Exposure Mode: 1
    Digital Zoom Ration: 1
    Focal Length In 35mm Film: 52mm
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    Gain Control: None
    Contrast: Normal
    Saturation: Normal
    Sharpness: Normal
    Subject Distance Range: Unknown
    ExifIFDPointer: 218
    X Resolution: 240
    Y Resolution: 240
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2013:02:08 16:24:43
    Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4.1 (Macintosh)
    DateCreated: 2013-02-06T06:46:14-05:00

    Now you’ve completely nailed both types of light here in this assignment. What’s more, you’ve made two compelling images! 馃檪 馃檪 馃檪 馃檪

    In the image of the model and the logs the light is very hard. You’ll notice how sharp the shadows are and how that can impact the overall image. Hard light usually means crisp shadows so as long as you’re aware of that you can use it to your advantage. For example if you wanted a very harsh looking contrasty image you could use that type of light.

    Take a look at the shadow on her arm and you’ll see what kind of impact this light has. It can really make things tricky.

    With an image like this it’s important to get a really great pose. If I remember correctly you’ve done some modelling yourself so I’m sure you’re aware of how important that is. In this image the pose feels quite forced and awkward but that’s just my subjective opinion!

    Also with images like this every little detail counts. So that little piece of seaweed underneath can be distracting. Especially if your image gets blown up quite large for some kind of campaign. Things like that can be fixed in post but you never want to rely on that. Always try to shoot things as clean as you can in-camera.

    Other than the confusing shadows (on her arm and back of legs) and the pose I like everything about the image. Nice job!

    In your image with soft light you’ve done very well. The light is gorgeous and it has a nice soft warmth to it. It looks like you’ve shot during the time of day known as magic hour or golden hour. Any photographer who knows anything knows that it really is a great time to shoot. It produces some of the most stunningly beautiful natural light available. Shooting at this time of day is very challenging though because it’s very dynamic and the light changes very fast. But if you’re ready you can take advantage of it like you did here.

    The depth of field drops off nicely to the point where her feet are nice and soft. Excellent!

    I also like the catch light in the model’s eyes in both images. Was this something you did on purpose?

    A couple minor notes here. Don’t forget to pay attention to your horizon line in the background. The image is crooked and might look a bit off when in print form. Again this is something you can fix in your post processing software but it’s always better to do it in-camera.

    Another item worth mentioning here is reflections. Notice how your model is nicely reflected in the sand here? Pay attention to reflections and use them when you can. Here are some creative examples of people using reflections in their images.

    Finally a word on watermarking. I personally can’t stand watermarked photographs. I come from a school of thinking that accepts some people will steal your images and there isn’t anything you can do about it. I prefer to actually give people permission to use my photographs for their projects. That way my images spread far and wide and are not locked down.

    Whatever the case I like what you’ve done here.

    Nice job!

    #21076

    Thank you for the critiques!

    #21077
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    My pleasure! 馃槈

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