Two Perspectives

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  • #24736
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Assignment 1.

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    #24751
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Hi Maxine,

    Thanks for submitting your assignment.

    There was quite a gap there between when you submitted this and when it was critiqued so thanks for your patience. The Fall break is always a good excuse to get students to actually practice their photography.

    Here is the exif data for these images:

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/IMG_3888.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2014:08:30 00:00:18
    Exposure Time: 1/179
    F Number: f / 2.80
    Exposure Program: Aperture priority
    ISO Speed Ratings: 400
    Metering Mode: Spot
    Flash: Flash fired, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 100mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon EOS 6D
    LensInfo: 4
    LensModel: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USMUUD
    LensSerialNumber: 000004dbe4
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 5472
    Pixel Y Dimension: 3648
    Maker Note: 910
    User Comment: 8694
    Date Time Digitized: 2014:08:30 00:00:18
    Subsec Time: 06
    Subsec Time Original: 06
    Subsec Time Digitized: 06
    Shutter Speed Value: 7.50
    Aperture Value: 3
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 3810.58
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 3815.90
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 2
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 8958
    ExifIFDPointer: 360
    GPSInfoIFDPointer: 9186
    Orientation: 1
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 72
    Y Resolution: 72
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2014:08:30 00:00:18

    http://photographyicon.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/IMG_3910.jpg
    Date Time Original: 2014:08:30 00:18:53
    Exposure Time: 1/179
    F Number: f / 8
    Exposure Program: Aperture priority
    ISO Speed Ratings: 400
    Metering Mode: Spot
    Flash: Flash fired, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length: 100mm
    White Balance: Manual white balance
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon EOS 6D
    LensInfo: 4
    LensModel: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USMUUD
    LensSerialNumber: 000004dbe4
    Exif Version:
    Flashpix Version:
    Color Space: 1
    Pixel X Dimension: 5472
    Pixel Y Dimension: 3648
    Maker Note: 910
    User Comment: 8694
    Date Time Digitized: 2014:08:30 00:18:53
    Subsec Time: 00
    Subsec Time Original: 00
    Subsec Time Digitized: 00
    Shutter Speed Value: 7.50
    Aperture Value: 6
    Exposure Bias: 1
    Focal Plane X Resolution: 3810.58
    Focal Plane Y Resolution: 3815.90
    Focal Plane Resolution Unit: 2
    Custom Rendered: Normal process
    Scene Capture Type: Standard
    InteroperabilityIFDPointer: 8958
    ExifIFDPointer: 360
    GPSInfoIFDPointer: 9186
    Orientation: 8
    YCbCr Positioning: 2
    X Resolution: 72
    Y Resolution: 72
    Resolution Unit: 2
    Date Time: 2014:08:30 00:18:53

    It looks like you used aperture priority and used f 2.8 in the wider imae and f 8 in the closer image. Can you tell me if this was done intentionally and why? It appears as though the flash fired in both of these images. For now please try to avoid using a flash in your photography assignments as it complicates things.

    Beyond that the manual white balance looks ok and the image meets the criteria although this clock isn’t exactly a mundane object. It’s quite interesting on it’s own. Whatever the case, you’ve filled your frame with your subject and made for a more interesting photo just by changing how you look at it.

    I was confused that the thumbnail of the image and the full size are oriented differently. Maybe you can tell me which orientation is correct, landscape or portrait?

    One thing to note from a compositional perspective is that in both images you’ve clipped parts of the edge of this clock. It’s no big deal for this assignment and you’ll learn more about composition as you progress through the course. For now you’ll want to be careful about the choices you make when cropping off parts of the main area of interest in your photo. It can detract from your image if it feels a bit off. For example at the bottom of IMG_3910.jpg the edge is cropped off just a tiny bit and it feels a bit awkward. In image IMG_3888.jpg the top of the frame is touching the top of the clock and that also feels weird. So just be careful about edges. Either have them in or out.

    Good job here, let me know what you think and if you have any question at all.

    See you on the next assignment.

    #24755
    Maxine Douglas
    Participant

    Hi Duncan,

    I used aperture priority at the widest my lens would allow to avoid increasing the ISO and due to insufficient lighting. The 2nd image, I used a more narrow aperture because the depth of field was too shallow. Everything was mostly out of focus at 2.8.

    Regarding image 3910, the correct orientation is portrait. I’m not sure why it turned sidewards, but I was initially having trouble uploading them to this site. For some odd reason, the orientation for the images are correct on my laptop.

    When you referred to cropping, do you mean ‘cropping by editing’ or ‘too close’ as in composing of my images? I’m now realizing-I was actually too close!

    Thanks,

    Maxine

    #24756
    Duncan Rawlinson
    Keymaster

    Oh yes, sometimes it’s tough to shoot in a low light environment.

    Sorry I guess I should have been more clear! I meant be careful with composing your images so you don’t cut little bits off. In other words watch the edges of your frame. In this case it’s no big, but if you did this to a person it doesn’t really look great.

    I did this recently, OOPS!

    Take a look at photo # 234 near the bottom on my recent post here: http://duncan.co/burning-man-2014/

    Also take a look at this:

    Thanks and

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